WHAT TO GET FOR FATHER’S DAY, PART 2: THE MIGHTY MANHATTAN

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WHAT TO GET FOR FATHER’S DAY, PART 2: THE MIGHTY MANHATTAN

Know a dad who likes to drink Manhattans? Well, save some money and up your reputation for great gift-giving with this combo of excellent local, limited edition Rye or Bourbon (Taconic Founder’s Rye or Taconic Straight Bourbon Whiskey) and an incredibly well-made vermouth (Dolin Rouge). Father’s Day special: $61.99 for both bottles! 

TACONIC STRAIGHT BOURBON WHISKEY: Tasting Notes from ‘Hudson Valley Magazine’

Voted “Best Bourbon” of the Hudson Valley by HV Magazine, Dutchess Private Reserve “has a lovely coppery color to it, or maybe like a gorgeous amber maple syrup. It starts off with a wonderful baked quality like cookies in the oven, butter, butterscotch, cookie dough, honey, vanilla, and lots of spice. It got a little bit of a bite up front, but goes down incredibly smoothly without a lot of burn. And it’s definitely not as sweet as it smells. In fact, it’s a beautiful, elegant, wonderful bourbon. Fantastic! Move over everyone, the valley now has yet another superior bourbon!” Manhattans made with bourbon pack more punch and offer less spice on the nose and palate, making for a beautifully rounded, powerful cocktail when mixed with Dolin Rouge.

TACONIC FOUNDER’S RYE WHISKEY: Tasting Notes from ‘The Whiskey Reviewer’

“Where other young ryes are redolent of dried banana, Founder’s Rye presents an uncharacteristic twist: banana pudding. One might therefore expect a particular smoothness to this 90 Proof rye. It doesn’t disappoint. An undercurrent of woodiness and spice gets under the tongue and tends to command the flavor, but it’s the rye’s mild sweetness, like summer fruit just before full ripeness, that glides it along. The finish is clean and even smoother, as fresh bananas and watermelon sourballs linger into a mild, mellow finish. This is a fine sipping Rye, and a wonderful addition to the expanding variety of young Rye whiskeys coming from America’s small, independent distillers.” 

DOLIN VERMOUTH DE CHAMBERY ROUGE reviewed by ‘The Speakista'

“The Dolin Rouge earns a solid 4 stars, if not 4 ¼ stars (out of five stars). It is a fine product and worthy for use. The Carpano [Antica, at more than twice the price] comes right at you with a lush cabernet type mouth feel and an almost aged port like presence. The floral and botanical notes are heavy on the palate the bitterness is strong, grows and lingers nicely on the after palate. The Dolin is a different actor playing the same role. Lighter in texture and consistency, it has a more brandy-like quality to it. The botanical notes are lighter and more subdued but still present on the palate. What is striking about this vermouth is the strong dried fruit character of its flavor profile — raisins, currants and dried cherries all seem to come forth. Whereas the Carpano is skewed to the less sweet side of the spectrum, the Rouge registers more in the middle to slightly higher sweetness category. Yet the sweetness is not sugary but rather a rich ‘honey-like’ sweetness that taken with the dried fruit notes is quite alluring.”

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WHAT TO GET FOR FATHER’S DAY, PART 1: MARTINI SURPRISE

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WHAT TO GET FOR FATHER’S DAY, PART 1: MARTINI SURPRISE

Know a dad who likes martinis? Well, save some money and blow his mind with this combo of exquisite gin (Costswolds Dry) and an incredibly well-made vermouth (Dolin Dry or Dolin Blanc). Father’s Day special: $61.99 for both bottles! 

COTSWOLDS DRY GIN: Tasting Notes from ‘THE GIN FOUNDRY

Fresh grapefruit citrus and floral lavender bursts forth, slapping us right round the nostrils. It’s dominating, but juniper is clearly discernible in the shadows, bringing a pine forest feel and a deep, resinous quality feel.

Sweet grapefruit, lavender and angelica tickle the tongue, but black pepper takes a somewhat Fifty Shades of Grey approach here, dominating all other botanicals and lighting a fire in the palate. Juniper and lavender fight through on the finish; the juniper is strong and medicinal, while the lavender brings a floral-herbal hybrid taste.

Cotswold’s Dry Gin has a genuinely tasty and intriguing flavor journey. The black pepper and lavender bring a really unique element but it never strays away from being a classic, juniper-heavy gin with a refreshing kick and a characterful and endlessly oscillating sweet-spice duality. That high oil content comes into play on the mouthfeel too and at 46%, it’s smooth enough to sip neat. 

“What a gin! It stands out from the crowd with its slight opalescence and hints of fennel and aniseed, and has been a big hit since its launch” (Suzy Atkins, The Telegraph). Cotswolds Gin is crafted using a tailor-made hybrid Holstein still (above)

DOLIN VERMOUTH DE CHAMBERY, BLANC AND DRY

Dolin Vermouth de Chambery Blanc

Served on the rocks with a twist of lemon, it has a wonderfully complex taste, herbal but more sweet than medicinal. It tastes like a meadow full of wildflowers, refreshing and pure. And each small sip carries so much interest you tend to drink it more slowly than a glass of wine to make it last. The recipe (and the firm) dates from the 19th century. Basically, Dolin vermouth is white wine steeped in as many as 54 plants and herbs (including wormwood, hyssop, quinine bark and rose petals) for some months. The difference between more commercial vermouths and this one is quite dramatic. Try it in a martini with a twist of lime to enhance the herbal character of the gin and to tone down the pepperiness - a nice surprise for any martini drinker.

Dolin Vermouth de Chambery Dry

Unlike Martini’s dry vermouth, Dolin’s is almost colorless. Why does color matter? Well, you can make a crystal clear martini and still get a hint of vermouth. Despite the subtle color, there is nothing subtle about the aroma. There is a strong blend of pear, oak, herb, citrus and spice notes. The taste is seemingly light at first, but once the vermouth coats the tongue, the herbs and spices blossom and cover the entire mouth. Towards the finish you get a hint of citrus and pear with a long lasting oak aftertaste along with some warmth. Unlike Martini’s dry vermouth, this one is very dry, so don’t go looking for a hint of sweetness. Hence perfect with an olive to make the classic martini.

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Le Marche: The Best Kept Secret in Italian Wine?

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Le Marche: The Best Kept Secret in Italian Wine?

Often described as “unspoiled,” Le Marche, one of Italy’s twenty distinct wine regions, sits on the Adriatic Sea on the north-central east coast. The rolling hills descending to the sea become increasingly menacing and dramatic as one heads west and south, where the landscape is dominated by the often snow-capped Apennine mountains. Besides it’s wines - which are, in my opinion, unfairly overlooked in deference to the wines of its neighbors in Tuscany and Umbria - Marche is well known for its shoemaking tradition, with the finest and most luxurious Italian footwear being manufactured in this region. Culturally, it’s most famous progeny was the great renaissance painter Raphael, who was born in the city of Urbino - which, like many villages in the region, retains much of its medieval hillside character.

The wines of Le Marche have been so overshadowed by the princely and pricey wines of its neighbors that a popular tourist site doesn’t even mention that wine is made there! However, as I have learned over the past two years or so, not just any wine but very, very good wine is made throughout the region. 

At Palate Wines & Spirits, we have just brought four wonderful wines from Le Marche into the store.

The DeAngelis Marche Rosata ($14.95) comes from the Ascoli Piceno region, in southernmost Marche, with vineyard holdings straddling the Abruzzo line. It makes sense then that their rose is made with the most renown grape variety in the Abruzzo region - Montepulciano. It is a lightly savory and refreshing food-friendly delight of a wine, perfect for summer’s light fare.

Andrea Felici’s Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi ($16.95) comes from what is considered the world’s best region for the Verdicchio grape, in the central west portion of the region. The wine, made of 100 percent Verdicchio, is a good example of the tension between fruit and minerality found in many of the world’s great white wines. A perfect accompaniment for hard cheeses, shrimp, scallops, whitefish or egg dishes.  

Turning everything up a notch (or two or three), Sartarelli, considered by many to be one of the world’s best producers of Verdicchio wines, bottles the Tralivio Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi Classico Superiore ($19.95) for those who appreciate the balance of fruit and minerality in a richer, broader, more sophisticated expression. This is a wondrous white and a perfect match for the best bloom and washed rind soft cheeses, roasted vegetables and just about anything this side of tomato sauce and grilled meats. 

Finally, we have brought in Lucchetti’s Guardengo Lacrima di Morro d’Alba Superiore ($19.95), perhaps the best expression of the Lacrima varietal I and my friends have ever tasted. A single vineyard selection, this deep red wine stands above and beyond in my experience due to it’s sumptuous balance of ripe fruitiness, fine tannins, earthyness and a fine, dry acidity - all of this coming through in aromas and flavors unique to this grape. Wonderful all by itself or with hearty meals of grilled beef, lamb, pork, stinky blue cheeses and rustic breads. 

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COME IN AND TASTE THE ROSÉS

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COME IN AND TASTE THE ROSÉS

The race is on, once again, for rosés: the quintessential summer wine to please the palate either as an aperitif or as a companion to salmon, salads or light cheeses.  Don't get me wrong, summer can still be the time for your hearty, robust reds - Cabernets, Petite Syrahs or Malbecs, just as long as you've got juicy steaks, ribs or burgers sizzling on the grill.

But for something lighter or easier a really good rosé is the way to go.  One can find a lot of mediocre roses out there but that is not the case with our Domiane Houchart Cote de Provence 2016 ($16.95).  This superior rosé is produced by the same family since the 1850s with the founder's grandaughter, Genevieve Quinot, now running the domaine which is located about 25 km from Aix-En-Provence.

A beautiful salmon color, this rosé is a masterful blend of grapes common to this region of France: Grenache, Syrah, Cinsault, Mourvèdre. Domaine Houchart is characterized by delicate citrus and strawberry aromas that carry onto your palate, evolving into hints of wild berries, melon and mineral notes with a finish that is clean and refreshing.

So jump into this summer with a glass of chilled Domaine Houchart Rosé 2016.  Sit back take a sip as you languidly lift your fork from a plate of cold salmon garnished with fresh dill and a dollop of crime frail he. Nothing could be better.

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Women Winemakers

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Women Winemakers

We are marking our 1.5 year anniversary by expanding our selection to focus on women winemakers from around the world. While we will continue to offer favorites such as the Crémant de Loire, the Huertos de los Palacios, and the Barrique Pinot Noir, we will be introducing new bottling and vineyards that share a unique quality: they are either produced or owned by women.

For the past 40 years, women have been making their mark on the wine world - a place traditionally dominated by men. Proven in studies to have more subtle and nuanced palates than their men, women continue to break the mould of tradition to create notes, flavors, and palates with success and critical acclaim. We look forward to sharing our favorites with you. 

With so many women produced wines hitting the market, we will be rotating and updating our inventory as we discover them together. As your local wine shop, we're constantly seeking and discovering our sense of purpose and place. To that end, we’re proud to share our first curated selection of 10 women-made red, white and sparkling wines. We hope you find this is in keeping with our promise to you: Fine libation at fair prices with a friendly staff. 

Be on the look-out for these new wines as they arrive in the coming weeks: they are marked with a gold dot on the bottleneck. 

See you soon!

The folks at Palate Wines

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The Reigning Wine of the Veneto

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The Reigning Wine of the Veneto

During the Renaissance, Venice produced four female artists of note. Today, it is producing some remarkable female wine producers. As part of Palate's focus on Women in Wine, we would like to introduce our customers to a spellbinding wine with a knowledgable, hardworking woman behind it. But first, the wine and its Italian soul. Let's go!

Venice, the beloved city of the Veneto, the leading wine region of northern Italy.  Most people associated this region with Prosecco,or Soave and of course for the reds, Valpolicella. But the Doge  of Veneto wines, the wine considered by wine experts as the finest wine of the region is AMORONE. 

Think of a dense, inky red wine produced from the corvina and rondinella grapes. How is it that this relatively cool region is able to produce such a remarkable, rich red?  It has to do with a style of wine making called appassimento. The best grapes from the harvest are let hang on the vine a little longer, then are taken in clusters and laid out on bamboo shelves to dry out in the sun for a few months. This allows water to evaporate and the sugars and flavor to intensify. The resulting wine is opulent, full bodied with an alcohol content of 15-16 percent.

This labor  intensive method, along with the risks of weather, affect the cost of the wine. Amarone is not a bargain table wine,  but your palate will seldom be treated to such a 5 star sip.

Palate is proud to introduce our wine lovers to our Alpha Zeta Amarone Val Policella 2013, an unforgettable selection.  Though the woman behind the wine is a native of New Zealand, she has lived for years in Italy and is passionate about all of her wines. The results have helped her develop a reputation throughout the Veneto. So, for that special occasion, for Valentine's Day, open a bottle of our Amarone with the one you love. It's really worth it.

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Palate's Holiday Gift Boxes

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Palate's Holiday Gift Boxes

Give the gift of wine and fine spirits!

Yaakov, our spirited sommelier, has put together a lovely arrangement of different grab bags fit for every occasion. Whether you need a last minute gift or a curated selection for your festive feast, we have a selection that will suite you and your guests' palate. 

The Grab Bag - $38

Kaleu Ugni Blanc, Argentina
Huetos de los Palacios, Spain
Rode Cellars Pinot Noir, California
Casa Julia Sauvignon Blanc, Chile
 

For Hearty Fare - $60

Lot 96 Petite Syrah, California
San Enrico Chianti, Italy
Chateau de Braque Bordeaux Superieur, France
Echeverria Carmenere, Chile
 

For Fish, Seafo0d, Light Pasta - $54

Premionte Cortese, Italy
Muscadet Jeremie Huchet, France
Intuition Cote du Rhone, France
Minarellas Albarino, Spain

Before & After Dinner - $74

Dona Antonia Reserve Tawny Port, Portugal
Byrrh Quinquina Apéritif, France
Monopolowa Gin 1L, Austria
Pamplune Grapefruit Rosé, France
* Mix two parts Gin and one part Grapefruit Rosé with a lemon twist for a fun cocktail.

The Local Option - $89

Salmon Run Mertitage, Finger Lakes, NY
Dr. Konstantine Frank Dry Reisling, Finger Lakes, NY
Ma Maison Champagne, NY
Black Dirt Bourbon, Warwick, NY

Holiday Spirits - $141

Tariquet Armagnac, France
Osocalos Rare Alambic Brandy, California
Black Dirt Apple Jack Brandy, Warwick, NY
Tito's Vodka 1L, Texas

The Kosher - $75

Taanug Merlot Cabernet (2 Bottles), Spain
Taanug Cava Sparkling, Spain
Dunsmore Irish Whiskey , Ireland

On the Rocks - $103

Studebaker Manahattan, Canada
Studebaker Old Fashioned, Canada
Campari Negroni, Italy
Evan Williams, Tennessee

The Finest of the Fine - $154

St. Innocent Pinot Noir, Oregon
Brunnello Di Montacino, Italy
Ladoucette Pouilly Fumé, France
Francois Millet Sancerre, France

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What makes wine Kosher?

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What makes wine Kosher?

This year the first night of Hannukah falls on the same date as Christmas Eve, so there will be festivities all around and in many homes wines will be enjoyed. Wine is an essential part of any Jewish holiday or celebration since wine is associated with joy. Observant Jews will drink only kosher wine, some for ritual use only and others at any time. So, what exactly is kosher wine?

Many people think of overly sweet concord wines like Manishewitz or Kedem and for many Othodox Jews who are not year round wine drinkers, this is true, but the term really has nothing to do with these wines. Nor does it have anything to do with a rabbi blessing the wine. The meaning of kosher wine goes back millennia.

In Biblical times, those who worshipped idols would pour out wine as a libation to their gods. Thus, Jewish law forbade the drinking of those wines. Wine, therefore, had to be a product that was produced only by Sabbath observing Jews from the time the grapes were pressed until it was bottled. All other wines were suspect as being wines used for pagan ritual use and thus forbidden.

It is even more complicated when a kosher wine is poured by a non Jew. Even though there aren't many pagan libations being poured these days, the age old custom still holds for observant Jews. So, in this case, the wine is flash pasteurized at a high temperature for a few seconds. The wine is then referred to as "mevushal", or "cooked" and can be poured by anyone. So there you have it. 

Palate Wines & Spirits is happy to announce that we are now carrying 2 kosher wines from Spain. Ta'anug (pleasure in Hebrew) ($16) is a full bodied blend of Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, ideal for brisket, lamb, or turkey dark meat. We also have a bubbly kosher Spanish Cava ($18) that is exceptional and would go well with latkes, either potato or the Sephardic version made from leaf greens (spinach, kale, chard) and leek. So, come in and see us as you light your candles and enjoy good food amid the warmth of family and friends. Merry Christmas and Hannukah Sameach to all our supporters. 

Yaakov Sullivan

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Jingle your bells and pop your corks!

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Jingle your bells and pop your corks!

First, thank you to all those Palate customers who supported us by selecting our wines for your Thanksgiving tables. We appreciate your business.

We've entered December, time to gear up for this month's holidays. As we all prepare we would like to suggest two great white wines to help you celebrate. New to our shelves are a New Zealand Glazebrook 2016 Sauvignon Blanc ($16) and a South African Simonsig 2015 Chenin Blanc ($16). 

The Glazebrook Sauvignon Blanc is from Marlborough on the northern tip of the South Island where the cool climate and ocean breezes help the grapes produce a wine that is extremely refreshing, perfect to drink young. Glazebrook offers the palate a stunning crisp, dry wine with high acidity combined with complex layers of tropical fruit and a limey edge with a lingering finish. 

From the other side of the globe, South Africa also offers the wine enthusiast some remarkably good red and white wines. This new arrival, the Simonsig Chenin Blanc comes from the hillsides outside Stellenbosch. The Chenin Blanc grape originated in France's Loire Valley but South Africa has also had great success in cultivating its vines in the Cape area. This Chenin Blanc has striking floral notes with ripe pear and just a hint of honey. Ideal with light fare- a turkey sandwich, shrimp, glazed chicken or seared tuna.

And what festive occasion would be complete without raising a glass of chilled bubbly, namely our Gabriel Cremant de Loire ($20) that many of you already know well. Buy a case for New Year's Eve and get 10 percent off the case. What may be left can be consumed on Valentine's Day. So jingle your bells and pop those corks. Come in and share a sip with us and find out about the surprise in the bag.......and remember to share your food and drink in a spirit of good cheer!

Cheers,

Yaakov

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What's in a grape?

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What's in a grape?

What's in a grape? Everything, of course, when it comes to wine. What's to distinguish a Cabernet Sauvignon from a Merlot, or Malbec, or a Carmenere? No doubt the "terroir" (the interplay between soil composition, sunlight, temperature, position of vines) is critical to the quality of the wine but the variety of the particular grape should guide a buyer in making their selection. What to expect from a wine and how can a certain grape in that wine meet those expectations.

Let's select one grape, one that is cultivated extensively in the southwest of France and in the Rhone Valley a bit to the east of Langduedoc Roussillon- the grand Grenache noir. Grenache is often part of a trinity of grapes that are blended, Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre . As a stand alone, this venerable grape is especially valued and makes for a range of stunning wines.

Grenache (known as garanacha in northern Spain) is the sole grape in making the wine of kings, popes and princes, Chateauneuf du Pape. It is also used in Cote du Rhone Village. Grenache is difficult to grow and challenging to make into wine, but when produced in a quality vineyard,Oo la la! Quel vin! Fine Grenache wines have an unmistakable purity and richness, with an aroma of cherry preserves. Not particularly high in tannins, it offers the drinker a sappy, luxurious texture.

So let Palate introduce you to some of our exciting Grenache wines. Enjoy a glass of Hecht & Bannier 2013 Minervois ($21), a delicious Grenache blend which has beautiful ripe, black fruit aromas followed by a hint of a smokey expression. 

Or select a bottle of our Plan de Dieu Cote du Rhone Villages 2012 ($15), an expressive Grenache, Syrah and Mourvèdre blend with a concentrated bouquet rich in cherry fruit and notes of spice, liquorice.

A new wine to Palate is our Domaine de Varquiere Rasteau ($20) from the village of Rasteau where the Chamfort family has been producing these wines for three generations. 70 percent Grenache this wine offers a deep ruby color oth a nose disclosing truffles and quince. Powerful on the palate, with a lingering finish this is a wine not to miss.

So come in and get aquatinted with Grenache and you will leave a happier dabbler in wine.

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The Riches of Bordeaux

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The Riches of Bordeaux

When one thinks of French wines, Bordeaux comes to mind. A strip of land extending down from the city of Bordeaux, it is an extensive area nestled along the banks of the Dordogne and Garonne rivers. Bordeaux produces some of the world's finest wines. The ruling red grapes here are Merlot, Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon. Bordeaux is the largest fine wine district on earth. Nowhere else in the wine world is the link between geography and finance so evident, with some bottles of St. Julien or St. Estephe selling for over $1,000 a bottle. Palate pleases its customers with some fine Bordeauxs but within a price range that can be enjoyed by imbibers other than hedge fund manipulators.

We would like to introduce you to two very fine Bordeauxs that will make you think you are right there at the chateau. Our Chateau de Brague 2012 ($16) is a fantastic value. This wine is 80 percent Merlot, with Cabernet Franc and Cabernet Sauvignon making up the difference. The vineyards are located on the right bank of the Dordogne in the vicinity of Fronsec, which produces some of Bordeaux's best value wines. As you sip Chateau de Brague you will pick up red ripe fruit on the nose with a beautiful minerality; dense on the palate with round tannins that make for a fresh fruity finish. Pair it with braised lamb, beef stew or duck.

Our second featured Bordeaux is in a category of its own. Chateau Mangot Saint Emilion Grand Cru 2010 ( $32) is a superb wine consisting of 85 percent Merlot, 9 percent Cabernet Franc, 6 percent Cabernet Sauvignon. Chateaut Mangot's grand cru hillside vines are grown in a clay and limestone soil with the grapes matured for 14 months in oak barrels. With notes of warm plums, stewed fruits, spices, this superb wine is fresh on the palate with fine tannins. A quality wine that ages well, for this price it is wise to buy a case. It would pair well with veal, a beef roast or pork loin.

We look forward to seeing you and giving you a tour of Bordeaux's wealth of wine regions as you leave Palate with one (or perhaps more) of these two fantastic wines that will ease your entry into winter.

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Sancerre - The Loire's Essense

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Sancerre - The Loire's Essense

The Loire is the longest river in France, meandering for 629 miles, starting in the Central Massif, in the south and emptying out into the Atlantic at Nantes, in the north. Along its banks are some of France's finest vineyards and over 1000 chateaux. The Loire Valley is referred to as the "Garden of France."

One of France's most distinguished white wines is produced in Sancerre, hence the name of the wine. 100 percent Sauvignon blanc, this is an aristocrat of wines, yet social enough to be found in almost every bistro and cafe in Paris due to its reputation for being a very food friendly wine.

Sancerre is bone dry with intense fruity aromas and pronounced mineral finish. Palate carries an excellent, highly rated Sancerre, our Francois Millet ($22), which is cultivated in the village of Bue whose clay and gravel soil render a full bodied, rounded wine of high quality. Excellent with grilled salmon ( squeeze some lime juice on the fillet, then smear on some Dijon mustard and drizzle with a bit of pure maple syrup) shellfish, or creamy pasta sauces. Just feel how this superb, aromatic wine stimulates the palate and lightens the richness of your entree. So come in and pick up a bottle and savor one of France's loveliest wines.

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The Third Pillar of Good Wine

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The Third Pillar of Good Wine

“In Spain, no matter if you make screwdrivers, at some point after you have saved a little money, the first thing you want to do is own a winery.  It is very important to the Spanish soul.”
        Yolanda Garcia Viadero, winemaker, Bodegas Valduero
 

Karen MacNeil in her tome, The Wine Bible, says that the Spanish use the verb elaborar instead of fabricar when talking about making wine.  This implies consciousness, time and the labor of creation rather than mere production. And as a result, Spain has recently catapulted its wines to a far higher level of quality. 

Palate is proud to carry a great selection of Spanish wines and we would like to feature three of them, nice summer whites, for this week’s news. Spain is a huge land mass of coastlines, mountains and high, hot, and dry plains. 

Our first featured white is Casamaro 2014 Verdejo ($14). This wine comes from Rueda, one of the most important white wine regions in Spain. The Rueda region  has extremely cold winters and fiercely hot summers, an ideal environment for growing the Verdejo grape. Palate’s Casamaro is all Verdejo making for a wine that has lots of bright lemon peel and blossom on the nose with stone fruit notes. It gives off a nice minerality that makes you want more. Many wine authorities consider Verdejo whites to be Spain’s best white wine.  Its clean, sharp acidity makes an excellent match with tapas, as well as tacos and like most Spanish whites, with seafood. 

Moving to the far northwest corner of Spain, to the Rias Baixas region in Galicia, you might think you were in Ireland.  Mountainous, green with lots of rain, this region is famous for its local grape, Albarino, known in Spain as the “aristocratic” grape.  We carry the Minarellos Albarino 2014 ($13),  a wine that enlivens the palate with a harmonious blend of fresh fruit and wild herbs.  Fresh, light with a burst of acidity, this wine is fermented in small stainless steel tanks after a careful maceration.  This wine places itself somewhere between a light creaminess and a crisp zestiness. Since most of Galicia has a coastline, this wines is excellent paired with crab cakes, prawns, salmon, fresh sardines. Think briny and you can’t go wrong.

Our third pillar of Spanish wines is different.  It comes from the Penedes region of  Catalonia.  Our Avinyo Petillant 2015 ($16) is a young, refreshing, vibrant wine with a tingling effervescence which makes it the region’s traditional summer quaffer. It is 60% Macabeu and 40% Petit Grain Muscat. The name means prickly but that quality is softened by notes of honeysuckle and almond with a bracingly dry, mineral finish.  This is a wine seen often in Barcelona where it graces the tables topped by grilled fish, squid, garlic, and tomatoes drizzled in heavy Spanish olive oil. 

Along with these white, Palate also carries a number of  excellent Spanish reds, so whether white for the summer or red for the coming chill of autumn, come in, learn of few words of Spanish and let us give you the tour of Spain, Europe’s third pillar of good wine.

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To Oak or Not to Oak?

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To Oak or Not to Oak?

Anyone who is well acquainted with this popular white wine knows its reputation for being either "oaky" or "not oaky" and this is understandable. The Chardonnay grape is considered “the” white grape and it is cultivated in a number of regions around the world.  American Chardonnays have traditionally been more oaky while the French version less so.


More often than not, Chardonnays are fermented in oak barrels or will even have oak chips added to the fermentation process, which gives the wine that vanilla or toast flavor. As for that “buttery” nose you find in many Chardonnays, it’s due to the malolactic fermentation process in which the harsher malic acid present during fermentation (tart like a Granny Smith apple) is converted into lactic acid which changes the profile of the wine into one that is smoother, softer. More and more Chardonnays today are aged in stainless steel which will feature a higher level of acidity. But enough of the technical.  Let’s introduce you to one of our California Chardonnays: MATCHBOOK CHARDONNAY 2014.


This wine is creamy with a hint of the buttery nose, along with detectible notes of pear and melon and nice vanilla making for a wine that is rich and ripe. Produced by a small family owned vineyard in the famed Dunnigan Hills of Napa California, Matchbook received 88 points out of 100 from the respected Tasting Panel Magazine. Aged for eight months in “Old Heads” oak barrels used in past vintages, there is less oak extracted allowing for a brighter, crisper flavor of the grape to come through. Excellent with any soft cheese or a rich pasta, like Alfredo. So come on in to meet and greet this great summer wine and compare it with some of our other Chardonnays that have a different tale to tell.

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Crémant - Champagne's alter ego

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Crémant - Champagne's alter ego

Graduations may be over but there are still other occasions to celebrate; anniversaries, birthdays, engagements, welcoming a new neighbor to Newburgh. And nothing can help set the mood more than Palate’s Crémant de Loire Domaine du Vieil Orme, ($20) the fraternal twin to fine champagne.


Crémant is a French sparkling wine, drier than Prosecco. Since it is not cultivated in the Champagne region, it cannot technically be called by that name.  Yet, by law, it must be made in the “méthod champagnoise,” the exact same way as champagne.  It must be made from the same grapes as champagne and must have a second fermentation in the bottle. There are about ten different regions that produce their own crémants. This one from the Loire is among the finest.


Our Crément de Loire comes from the venerable Domaine du Vieil Orme (Estate of the Old Elm) established in 1849. Located in the Loire Valley, the terroir of the estate is clay and limestone, ideal for the Chardonnay grape which is the single one in this Crémant.  Pop the cork and find yourself pouring a bubbly wine that is creamy and luscious, featuring a “soupcon” of honey with a bright, crisp acidity. Let the bubbles tickle the nose and tingle on the palate.  Drinking this Crémant de Loire demands a toast, if only to itself.


This elegant festive wine is ideal as an apéritif, stimulating the appetite for what is to come, or is excellent with a rich fish, such as salmon, mackerel or shellfish.  It also is an appropriate partner for those dishes with rich French cream sauces.  


So, come in and begin your celebration with us at Palate. Then continue at home where your guests will surely ask for more, which mean two bottles are always better than one.

 

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The Gin Bin

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The Gin Bin

This week, we are featuring a crystal spirit which is enjoyed most on those languid summer afternoons and lingering evenings. It conjures up images of Humphrey Bogart, Ernest Hemingway or Marlene Dietrich.  In film, it was immortalized in the 1930s by the “Thin Man” and later in the James Bond films. I’m referring of course to Gin, that mysterious elixir that often baffles the consumer. It is the ideal mixer, whether you are having a martini, a Gimlet or my favorite of all, the heat breaking Gin & Tonic.  Served in a tall well chilled glass, the spiciness of the gin embraces the bitterness of the tonic both of which are accented by the zest of the fresh lime (or lemon can be used as well). I can’t think of any other summer cocktail that plays so well with every part of the palate.


In the US, vodka has taken the front seat for a long time but fortunately, gin has been tiptoeing out of the shadows and finding its way into our glasses once again. Many drinkers are intimidated by the complexity of gin and go for the straight forwardness of vodka. What exactly is the difference between gin and vodka?  Ah, it’s those aromatic botanicals that give the gin its own distinctive character. Classically, the main botanical was and still is the king of gin botanicals- the juniper berry. In the art of distilling gin, the botanicals are the paint, the still or pot, the brush and the distiller is the painter.  Today, small distillers are producing a wide range of gins which include an incredible flavor profile: coriander, elderflower, citrus peels, lavender, cardamon, cassia bark and orris root.  


At Palate Wines & Spirits we have a “gin bin” which offers a select but wonderfully varied range of gins.  Two are featured here. Broker’s Gin ($27) can be immediately identified by the black bowler hat that sits on top of the bottle. This fine English gin is excellent for either the martini or the G&T.  Broker’s has been made for over 200 years, outside the English city of Birmingham. Distilled in traditional copper pots, its pure spirit is derived from English wheat and makes use of ten different botanicals which come from all over the globe, though as a traditional gin, the juniper berry will predominate.  Choose a good tonic for your G&T and a fine vermouth for your martini (try our French vermouth, the Dolin dry white) but remember, there is an argument over how much vermouth should be added to the gin, and should it be stirred or shaken? Winston Churchill said the only way to make a martini was with ice cold gin and a bow in the direction of France.


Our second featured gin is distilled closer to home: Vermont’s Caledonia Spirits Barr Hill Gin ($43) made from its own grain and farmed honey. This company is deeply rooted in the agriculture and beekeeping of Vermont and committed to ecological sustainability. Their unique gin is distilled from local grains, either corn, wheat or barley    , and its formula is that simple, pure grain spirit and zesty juniper berry. Then, after distillation they add local, raw honey, just before bottling.  This lends a special floral quality to the gin that will vary depending on the season and flower. You may think the honey will come on too strong but it doesn’t.  It rather serves as a perfect compliment to the juniper berry. This is a fine tuned gin.  Caledonia Spirits offers its own list of recommended cocktails but I find it marvelous on the rocks just sipping as is.

We sell other gins as well, each with its own story, so please, come in this week and we can discuss, if not gins, then our wines, one of which will be singled out next week for special attention…

 

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Introduction to Summer

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Introduction to Summer

Summer… a time for relaxing and just kicking back, whether on the deck, in the garden, or at the shore. Whether the air is warm and breezy with blue skies overhead, or lazy, hazy and humid, it's time to gather with friends around good food and, of course, good wine. Here are thoughts on the subject. 

We are featuring three wines here at Palate to help get your summer events in gear; a hearty red, a crisp white and a light pleasing rose. As to how many glasses of each, just remember: "People who wonder if the glass is half full or half empty miss the point. You can always refill it".

Our featured red is a Tuscan standout, a remarkable Chianti for the price ($15). The 2014 San Enrico Tenuta La Gigliola is 85 percent Sangiovese and 15 percent Canaiolo Colorino with great color and soft tannins, while maintaining rich fruit aromas characteristic of the two grapes. Taste the peppery note making for a fine, long finish. Great with bar-b-que, steak or hearty pasta dishes.

Our featured white comes from Austria, the 2015 GV Gruner Vertliner ($13). This is a wine that should be drunk early and often. This ideal summer wine is Austria's most famous white, young and crisp with a green and herbaceous flavor and an acidity that explodes in the mouth. You'll find this Gruner Vertliner an ideal companion for salads, seafood or light pastas. It is one of the few wines that can be paired with asparagus or artichokes, grilled or steamed. And of course it is great for just sipping.

No wine is perhaps as strongly tied in with summer than a fine rose and we have one of the best: our 2016 Domaine Houchart Cotes de Provence ($16). This luscious rose is made from grapes typical of southern France: Grenache, Syrah Cinsault, Cabernet Saivignon and Mourvèdre. Quite a mouthful there, but oh, what a delight on the palate. Just enough acidity to stimulate, and a delicate hint of citrus that softens as it goes down. This is a wine that stands on its own for just pouring and sipping, again and again until, whoops, I guess we finished that off... As you recall that that glass is refillable... Domaine Houchart Rose is a good friend with oysters, shellfish or a zesty chicken salad, or as an apéritif with almonds or olives.

So come on in and hear some more about these enjoyable selected wines. Conversation, humor and learning a little about wine is also part of the experience at Palate Wines & Spirits. We'll all enjoy. A bientot.

Yaakov Sullivan

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